SCC—the Arbitration Institute of the Stockholm Chamber of Commerce
Produced in partnership with Vinge

The following Arbitration practice note produced in partnership with Vinge provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • SCC—the Arbitration Institute of the Stockholm Chamber of Commerce
  • What is the SCC?
  • The composition of the SCC
  • The Secretariat
  • The Board
  • The various SCC rules
  • SCC model arbitration clauses
  • The SCC’s services under the UNCITRAL rules
  • UNCITRAL Transparency Rules
  • The SCC’s website

SCC—the Arbitration Institute of the Stockholm Chamber of Commerce

CORONAVIRUS (COVID-19): Many arbitral organisations have responded to the coronavirus pandemic with practical guidance and/or changes to their usual procedures and ways of working. For information on how this content and relevant arbitration proceedings may be impacted, see Practice Note: Arbitral organisations and coronavirus (COVID-19)—practical impact. For additional information, see: Coronavirus (COVID-19) and arbitration—overview.

What is the SCC?

The Arbitration Institute of the Stockholm Chamber of Commerce (SCC) is part of, but independent from, the Stockholm Chamber of Commerce. The Arbitration Institute was established in 1917.

The SCC was recognised in the 1970s by the United States and the Soviet Union as a neutral centre for the resolution of trade disputes. As a consequence, the SCC still remains a popular forum for East/West disputes, ie disputes between one or more parties from North America or Europe and one or more parties from Russia, China, or the former Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) countries.

The number of cases filed with the SCC has increased considerably over the last 25 years and the SCC has emerged as one of the most important and frequently used arbitration institutions worldwide. The SCC’s recent statistics are available on its website (see also Practice Note: Arbitration statistics and surveys).

The SCC administers a broad range of domestic and international commercial arbitration disputes and is also a well-recognised

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