SCC Rules (2010)—emergency arbitration [Archived]
Produced in partnership with Vinge

The following Arbitration practice note produced in partnership with Vinge provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • SCC Rules (2010)—emergency arbitration [Archived]
  • When to use the emergency arbitrator procedure
  • How to apply for the appointment of an emergency arbitrator
  • The powers of the emergency arbitrator
  • The emergency arbitrator’s decision

SCC Rules (2010)—emergency arbitration [Archived]

ARCHIVED: This Practice Note has been archived and is not maintained.

This Practice Note concerns emergency arbitration under the 2010 Arbitration Rules of the Arbitration Institute of the Stockholm Chamber of Commerce (SCC) (the 2010 SCC Rules). The 2010 SCC Rules apply to SCC arbitrations commenced on or after 1 January 2010, unless the parties agree otherwise.

For guidance on the 2017 SCC Rules, which apply to SCC arbitrations commenced on or after 1 January 2017 (unless the parties agree otherwise), see: SCC arbitration—overview.

In June 2017, the SCC published a Practice Note analysing emergency arbitrator proceedings at the SCC in 2015/16. The article by SCC Legal Counsel Anja Håvedal-Ipp presents an overview of applications for the appointment of an emergency arbitrator during the seven years since the introduction of emergency arbitrator proceeding in the SCC Arbitration Rules and SCC Rules of Expedited Arbitration.

Since 2010, the SCC has seen a total of 27 applications for the appointment of an emergency arbitrator, with 13 of those received in 2016. For a summary of the findings, see our update: Review of emergency arbitrator proceedings at the SCC in 2015/16, LNB News 06/06/2017 82.

When to use the emergency arbitrator procedure

A party would most likely apply for the appointment of an emergency arbitrator where an immediate remedy is required, for example to protect an asset.

The emergency arbitrator

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