SCC Rules (2010)—answering the Request for Arbitration [Archived]
Produced in partnership with Vinge

The following Arbitration practice note produced in partnership with Vinge provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • SCC Rules (2010)—answering the Request for Arbitration [Archived]
  • Receiving the Request for arbitration
  • Things to consider before submitting the Answer
  • The Answer
  • Drafting the Answer
  • Counterclaims and set-offs
  • Submitting the Answer
  • Choosing an arbitrator

SCC Rules (2010)—answering the Request for Arbitration [Archived]

ARCHIVED: This Practice Note has been archived and is not maintained.

This Practice Note introduces the structure of the 2010 Arbitration Rules of the Arbitration Institute of the Stockholm Chamber of Commerce (SCC) (the 2010 SCC Rules). The 2010 SCC Rules apply to SCC arbitrations commenced on or after 1 January 2010, unless the parties agree otherwise.

For guidance on the 2017 SCC Rules, which apply to SCC arbitrations commenced on or after 1 January 2017 (unless the parties agree otherwise), see: SCC arbitration—overview.

Receiving the Request for arbitration

The claimant submits the Request for arbitration to the SCC. The SCC Secretariat then forwards the request for arbitration and accompanying documents to the respondent (SCC, art 5).

The SCC Secretariat will set a date by which the respondent must submit an Answer. The length of time that the SCC Secretariat gives to the claimant varies depending on the circumstances of the case but 14 days is a typical amount of time. It is possible for the Respondent to ask the SCC for an extension of time (SCC, art 7).

The arbitration will proceed even if the respondent fails to file the answer (SCC, art 5).

Things to consider before submitting the Answer

The respondent should review the arbitration clause for at least two reasons. First, it may be possible to challenge the jurisdiction of the

Popular documents