Roles and responsibilities within a financial institution—a guide for an in-house banking and finance lawyer
Roles and responsibilities within a financial institution—a guide for an in-house banking and finance lawyer

The following Banking & Finance guidance note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Roles and responsibilities within a financial institution—a guide for an in-house banking and finance lawyer
  • Roles and responsibilities within a financial institution
  • Front office
  • Middle office
  • Back office

Roles and responsibilities within a financial institution

This Practice Note is designed to cover the key roles within a financial institution, the responsibilities that each such role has and how and when an in-house lawyer may come into contact with these roles.

Financial institutions may include investment banks, retail banks, private wealth banks or other investment arms—including asset managers or funds. This Practice Note is primarily aimed at in-house banking and finance lawyers working at investment banks.

Front office

The front office is the client-facing side of a bank which generates the bank's revenue.

Some of the roles of individuals working in the front office might include:

  1. selling new trading ideas and concepts to investors

  2. helping clients find solutions to their financing issues

  3. originating and/or distributing investment products

  4. trading secondary market products

  5. issuing debt securities via the debt capital markets

  6. commercial lending, and

  7. compiling research reports

In an investment bank, the sales and trading components work very closely together.

The sales team typically call on potential investors with suggestions of trading ideas and then convey the feedback from the investors back to the trading team. The investors may come up with ideas of how they would like their products to be structured and set out what issues they are trying to address in entering into new products.

Sales and trading

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