Residential flat schemes—criss-cross or crossover scheme
Residential flat schemes—criss-cross or crossover scheme

The following Property guidance note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Residential flat schemes—criss-cross or crossover scheme
  • What is a criss-cross or crossover scheme?
  • The lease
  • Repairs
  • Who is the landlord?
  • Transfer of the legal interests
  • Insurance

What is a criss-cross or crossover scheme?

Under the traditional arrangement, a single-fronted, terraced house is divided into two flats, one above another. Each flat has its own front and back doors. There are usually no common internal or external areas (although occasionally a backyard and the accessways to and from the front and back doors may be shared) and no means of internal access between the flats.

The scheme is also colloquially known as the ‘Tyneside flat’ scheme, as it exists predominantly in the North East of England. However, it is no longer limited to Tyneside flats. So-called ‘Warner houses’ in parts of east London are structured on a similar basis, as are maisonettes throughout the country. It can also be used where any property originally constructed as a single dwelling is subsequently converted into two flats.

The lease

Each flat is held on a long lease, usually for a peppercorn rent, and contains obligations for repair, maintenance and insurance. Responsibility for repairs is split horizontally, in the same way as the flats are divided physically. As the lower flat is dependent on the upper flat for shelter, the demise of the upper flat includes the roof and puts responsibility for repairs to it on the tenant of that flat. Correspondingly, because the upper flat is dependent on