Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations, SI 2013/1471 (RIDDOR)—general requirements
Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations, SI 2013/1471 (RIDDOR)—general requirements

The following Environment practice note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations, SI 2013/1471 (RIDDOR)—general requirements
  • What is RIDDOR?
  • Who must report?
  • 'Responsible person'
  • What must be reported?
  • Work-related accidents
  • Types of reportable injury—death
  • Types of reportable injury—specified injuries to workers
  • Types of reportable injury—injuries to non-workers
  • Certain occupational diseases
  • More...

What is RIDDOR?

Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations, SI 2013/1471 (RIDDOR) is a regulation which requires employers and others in control of workplaces to report and keep records of:

  1. work-related accidents which result in death

  2. work-related accidents which cause serious injuries (reportable injuries)

  3. diagnosed cases of certain occupational diseases

  4. certain 'dangerous occurrences' with the potential to cause harm, and

  5. gas-related incidents

These reporting requirements allow regulators, such as the Health and Safety Executive (HSE), local authorities, the police and the Office for Rail and Road (ORR) to identify where and how risks arise and whether they should be investigated.

The previous RIDDOR regime was amended in October 2013 by RIDDOR, SI 2013/1471. The main changes simplified the reporting requirements of the RIDDOR regime by:

  1. changing the classification of 'major injuries' with a shorter list of 'specified injuries'

  2. replacing the previous list of 47 types of industrial diseases with eight categories of reportable work-related illnesses, and

  3. having fewer 'dangerous occurrences' that require reporting

Who must report?

'Responsible person'

A 'responsible person' must make the report when a report is required.

The definition of 'responsible person' changes, depending on the work-related incident, as follows:

  1. for non-fatal injuries, fatalities and dangerous occurrences, the 'responsible person' is either the employer or for self-employed persons or non-workers, the person who by means of their carrying on any undertaking was in control

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