Putting in place secondments which benefit all involved
Produced in partnership with Mark Prebble of Lawyers In Business
Putting in place secondments which benefit all involved

The following In-house Advisor practice note Produced in partnership with Mark Prebble of Lawyers In Business provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Putting in place secondments which benefit all involved
  • Looking at secondments from the law firm’s perspective
  • What are you after and are there better options?
  • Agreeing the specification
  • Selecting the secondee
  • Practicalities
  • Mini induction
  • Portfolio
  • Regular review

Looking at secondments from the law firm’s perspective

Major clients have been accustomed to insisting on free secondees as part of the deal to get on a panel. Extracting a benefit in this way from a law firm can be tempting, but may be a poor option if there are other ways in which the client can benefit which do not cause as much of a headache to the firm.

No firm wants to send the best associates on secondment, but at the same time if someone is not a good ambassador for the firm the client will be dissatisfied. So many associates have been hired by clients, or associates have decided to move in-house, on the strength of secondments, that firms are being less accommodating.

Firms are likely to be more receptive if some payment is made and the secondment is not five days a week.

What are you after and are there better options?

Consider what you are looking for in a secondee:

  1. someone to cover for a gap in resources caused by resignation, sickness or leave

  2. someone to help with a specific project or an accumulation of additional work

  3. someone wh

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