Procedure for applying from overseas
Produced in partnership with Gary McIndoe of Latitude Law
Procedure for applying from overseas

The following Immigration guidance note Produced in partnership with Gary McIndoe of Latitude Law provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Procedure for applying from overseas
  • Initial issues that may affect an application
  • Key considerations
  • Locating information on the application process
  • Key steps in the application process
  • Where should the application be made?
  • When should the application be made?
  • The date the application is treated as being made
  • How must the application form be submitted?
  • What supporting documents are required and how must they be submitted?
  • more

This Practice Note sets out the procedure for entry clearance (prior permission to enter the UK) applications that are made outside the UK and provides practical tips on making an application. For general information on entry clearance, see Who requires permission to travel to the UK—overview. This Practice Notice does not provide information on applications in specific categories.

This Practice Note should be read with the Practice Note: Applying from overseas and the Practice Notes on the substantive immigration category in which the application is to be made.

Initial issues that may affect an application

Deportation

If a person has previously been deported from the UK, they will be barred from re-entering the country until the deportation order is revoked or expires. Most deportation orders run indefinitely, but some expire after ten years. If a person has a deportation order signed against them, this should be reviewed to check if it is still in operation. See Practice Notes: Deportation and Challenging deportation decisions for further guidance.

General grounds for refusal and previous refusals

A person may also face refusal under the general grounds set out in the Immigration Rules, Part 9. Examples include criminal convictions or pending charges in any country, previous breaches of UK immigration law or issues relating to previous conduct or character. In some cases they may also be