Private client—Switzerland—Q&A guide

The following Private Client practice note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Private client—Switzerland—Q&A guide
  • 1. How does an individual become taxable in your jurisdiction?
  • 2. What, if any, taxes apply to an individual’s income?
  • 3. What, if any, taxes apply to an individual’s capital gains?
  • 4. What, if any, taxes apply if an individual makes lifetime gifts?
  • 5. What, if any, taxes apply to an individual’s transfers on death and to his or her estate following death?
  • 6. What, if any, taxes apply to an individual’s real property?
  • 7. What, if any, taxes apply on the import or export, for personal use and enjoyment, of assets other than cash by an individual to your jurisdiction?
  • 8. What, if any, other taxes may be particularly relevant to an individual?
  • 9. What, if any, taxes apply to trusts or other asset-holding vehicles in your jurisdiction, and how are such taxes imposed?
  • More...

Private client—Switzerland—Q&A guide

This Practice Note contains a jurisdiction-specific Q&A guide to private client in Switzerland published as part of the Lexology Getting the Deal Through series by Law Business Research (published: September 2020).

Authors: Kellerhals Carrard—Ingrid Iselin; Giovanni Stucchi; Vanessa Thompson

1. How does an individual become taxable in your jurisdiction?

Individuals domiciled or resident in Switzerland are subject to unlimited taxation in Switzerland.

The concepts of domicile and residence may have different meanings and different translations in the respective languages. In the context of the present contribution, an individual is considered domiciled in Switzerland if he resides there with the intention of permanent establishment (or when federal law gives him or her a special legal domicile there). The intention is decisive, while the duration of stay, in itself, is not. An individual is considered resident in Switzerland for tax purposes if he or she resides there without any appreciable interruption (1) at least 30 days in gainful employment or (2) at least 90 days without gainful employment. In case of residence, the only relevant matter is the duration; the intention is not relevant.

Individuals who are neither domiciled nor resident in Switzerland for tax purposes may nevertheless be subject to tax in Switzerland, but in this hypothesis only to limited taxation. This is the case if such individuals (1) are owners, associates or usufructuaries of companies in Switzerland,

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