Private client—Ireland—Q&A guide
Private client—Ireland—Q&A guide

The following Private Client practice note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Private client—Ireland—Q&A guide
  • 1. How does an individual become taxable in your jurisdiction?
  • 2. What, if any, taxes apply to an individual’s income?
  • 3. What, if any, taxes apply to an individual’s capital gains?
  • 4. What, if any, taxes apply if an individual makes lifetime gifts?
  • 5. What, if any, taxes apply to an individual’s transfers on death and to his or her estate following death?
  • 6. What, if any, taxes apply to an individual’s real property?
  • 7. What, if any, taxes apply on the import or export, for personal use and enjoyment, of assets other than cash by an individual to your jurisdiction?
  • 8. What, if any, other taxes may be particularly relevant to an individual?
  • 9. What, if any, taxes apply to trusts or other asset-holding vehicles in your jurisdiction, and how are such taxes imposed?
  • More...

This Practice Note contains a jurisdiction-specific Q&A guide to private client in Ireland published as part of the Lexology Getting the Deal Through series by Law Business Research (published: September 2020).

Authors: Matheson—John Gill; Lydia McCormack

1. How does an individual become taxable in your jurisdiction?

An individual's tax treatment will depend on his or her domicile and residence:

  1. 'Domicile' is not defined under Irish law. Usually, a person's domicile is the jurisdiction in which they live with the intention of residing there permanently.

  2. 'Resident' is defined under section 819 of the Taxes Consolidation Act (TCA) as being present in Ireland for a period of 183 days or more in the tax year, or being present in Ireland for 280 days or more in the current and the previous tax year. The Irish tax year is a calendar year.

  3. 'Ordinarily resident' under section 820 of the TCA 1997 occurs when an individual has been resident in Ireland for three consecutive years. An individual will be considered ordinarily resident until he or she has not been resident for three consecutive years.

If an individual is resident and domiciled in Ireland, he or she will be liable for tax on his or her worldwide income and capital gains.

If an individual is not domiciled in Ireland but is resident or ordinarily resident, he or she will be liable for tax on

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