Post-award remedies under the arbitration rules of major arbitral institutions and those of UNCITRAL
Produced in partnership with Jonathan Lim of WilmerHale
Post-award remedies under the arbitration rules of major arbitral institutions and those of UNCITRAL

The following Arbitration guidance note Produced in partnership with Jonathan Lim of WilmerHale provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Post-award remedies under the arbitration rules of major arbitral institutions and those of UNCITRAL
  • Exhausting arbitral processes of appeal or review before challenging or appealing awards in court
  • The ICC Arbitration Rules
  • The LCIA Arbitration Rules
  • The HKIAC Administered Arbitration Rules
  • The SIAC Arbitration Rules
  • The ICDR Arbitration Rules
  • The DIAC Arbitration Rules
  • The UNCITRAL Arbitration Rules

This Practice Note considers the limited grounds on which a party to international arbitration proceedings may apply for the correction, review and interpretation of an award to either an arbitral tribunal or arbitral institution under the institutional arbitration rules of the International Court of Arbitration of the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC), the London Court of International Arbitration (LCIA), Hong Kong International Arbitration Centre (HKIAC), Singapore International Arbitration Centre (SIAC), Dubai International Arbitration Centre (DIAC), International Centre for Dispute Resolution (ICDR), as well as the arbitration rules of the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL). This Practice Note also discusses whether parties to such arbitration rules can challenge or appeal arbitral awards before tribunals or arbitral institutions (where relevant), concluding that such steps are generally only available before the courts of the seat of the arbitration.

Exhausting arbitral processes of appeal or review before challenging or appealing awards in court

For example, the Arbitration Act 1996 (AA 1996), which principally applies to arbitrations seated in England and Wales or Northern Ireland (England and English are used as a convenient shorthand), permits challenges and appeals to arbitration awards in certain circumstances (AA 1996, ss 67–69)—see Practice Note: AA 1996—challenging and appealing arbitral awards in the English court.

However, any such challenge or appeal to the English court under AA 1996,