Ozone-depleting substances—prohibition on using R22 gas
Produced in partnership with ELM Law
Ozone-depleting substances—prohibition on using R22 gas

The following Environment guidance note Produced in partnership with ELM Law provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Ozone-depleting substances—prohibition on using R22 gas
  • Brexit impact
  • What is R22 gas?
  • Sectors affected
  • Legislation phasing out the use of R22
  • Prohibition on using R22
  • Penalties and enforcement
  • F-gases
  • ODS or F-gas regulation?
  • Implications for property transactions

Brexit impact

As of exit day (31 January 2020) the UK is no longer an EU Member State. However, in accordance with the Withdrawal Agreement, the UK has entered an implementation period, during which it continues to be subject to EU law. This has an impact on this content. For further guidance, see: Brexit—impact on environmental law and Brexit Bulletin—key updates, research tips and resources.

What is R22 gas?

R22 (chlorodifluoromethane) is a refrigerant gas that is a hydrochorofluorocarbon (HCFC) and a type of ozone-depleting substance (ODS).

ODS damage the ozone layer which protects life on earth from harmful UV radiation. The three main types of ODS are described in Table A.

Table A—Main types of ODS

Type of ODS Description
Chlorofluorocarbon (CFCs) CRCs like R12 are the most harmful ODS and were banned in the 1990s.
Halons Used mainly in fire protection systems and are only used for critical uses such as extinguishing fires from aircraft. These uses will be phased out when ODS alternatives are found.
Hydrochloroflourocarbons (HCFCs) The largest remaining use of ODS. Used mainly