Own interest conflicts—when can you act? 2011 [Archived]
Produced in partnership with RadcliffesLeBrasseur

The following Practice Compliance practice note produced in partnership with RadcliffesLeBrasseur provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Own interest conflicts—when can you act? 2011 [Archived]
  • What is an own interest conflict?
  • When might an own interest conflict arise?
  • Can you act?
  • Failure to comply

Own interest conflicts—when can you act? 2011 [Archived]

There are two types of conflict: own interest and client conflict. This Practice Note explains when you can act if there is or may be an own interest conflict. For the wider regulatory requirements on conflicts of interests, see Practice Note: Conflicts of interest—regulatory requirements 2011 [Archived].

For specific guidance on:

  1. general client conflicts, see General client conflicts—when can you act? 2011 [Archived]

  2. client conflicts in relation to conveyancing, property transaction and mortgages, see Conveyancing client conflicts—when can you act?

  3. client conflicts in relation to criminal matters, see Client conflicts in criminal matters—when can you act?

  4. client conflicts in relation to restructuring and insolvency, see Conflicts in restructuring and insolvency

This Practice Note reflects the requirements of the SRA Handbook 2011. It has not been updated for the SRA Standards and Regulations, in force from 25 November 2019. See Practice Notes: Conflicts of interest 2019 and Conflicts of interest—SRA 2011 regime and SRA 2019 regime compared for more information on the revised requirements.

What is an own interest conflict?

An own interest conflict arises where:

  1. your duty to act in the best interests of a client (in relation to a matter) conflicts with your own interests in relation to that or a related matter, or

  2. there is a significant risk that your duty to act in the best interests of

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