Networking and business development for family lawyers
Produced in partnership with Ursula Rice of Family First Solicitors Ltd
Networking and business development for family lawyers

The following Family practice note produced in partnership with Ursula Rice of Family First Solicitors Ltd provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Networking and business development for family lawyers
  • First steps
  • Who should do it?
  • Breaking the ice
  • Follow-up
  • Social media and networking
  • Under the radar networking
  • Results
  • Networking tips

The purpose of networking and business development is not to generate sales, leads or push a promotion. Meeting individual people and getting to know them would be a very inefficient way of doing this. The point of networking is to increase the visibility and credibility of your firm and of individual lawyers. As a by-product, it is likely to produce a trusted network of contacts and suppliers.

First steps

Before tackling networking for the first time, some essential initial practical steps to take include:

  1. consider where your firm sits in the market and if there is a marketing department, go and talk to them—they will be pleased to help lawyers get the message of the firm across

  2. in a firm without a marketing department, work out what is different about the firm, compared to other firms—is it something legal such as international expertise or in house advocacy? Or something practical such as offering a free half-hour interview?

  3. it helps to have a focus on who the lawyer wants to build a network with and decide in advance what kind of people need to get to know the firm—businesspeople between the ages of 35 and 50? Or a start-up company? Anyone in the building trade? Be specific. Loss of focus means results are hard to measure.

Who should do it?

Networking and business development should not be done

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