Marine planning under Marine and Coastal Access Act 2009
Produced in partnership with Nicola Canty, Barrister of 9 Hazel Tree Chambers
Marine planning under Marine and Coastal Access Act 2009

The following Environment guidance note Produced in partnership with Nicola Canty, Barrister of 9 Hazel Tree Chambers provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Marine planning under Marine and Coastal Access Act 2009
  • Brexit impact
  • The Maritime Spatial Planning Directive 2014
  • Implementation in the UK
  • Marine Management Organisation (MMO)
  • UK Marine Policy Statement (MPS)
  • Marine plans
  • Marine licensing
  • Other consents
  • The Coastal Concordat
  • more

Brexit impact

This content is likely to be impacted by the UK’s withdrawal from the EU. For further information on the implications of leaving the EU for planning law and practice, see: Brexit—implications for planning law and practice—overview and Practice Note: Brexit—the implications for English and Welsh planning law and practice.

The Maritime Spatial Planning Directive 2014

The Maritime Spatial Planning Directive 2014 (Directive 2014/89/EU) (MSPD) established a common framework for maritime spatial planning, by which the relevant Member States’ authorities analyse and organise human activities in marine areas to support sustainable development and growth in the maritime sector, applying an ecosystem-based approach to promote the coexistence of relevant activities and uses.

The MSPD requires Member States (other than landlocked Member States), to establish and implement marine plans within their marine waters by 2021. Member States retain competence to design and determine the format and the content of the plan(s) and must bring into force the laws, regulations and administrative provisions necessary to comply with the MSPD by 18 September 2016.

Implementation in the UK

Marine planning in the UK is governed by Part 3 of the Marine and Coastal Access Act 2009 (MCAA 2009). MCAA 2009 gives devolved administrations responsibility for their inshore and offshore waters as the 'responsible marine planning authorities', with the exception of