Looking to the future—SRA consultation responses [Archived]
Looking to the future—SRA consultation responses [Archived]

The following Practice Compliance guidance note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Looking to the future—SRA consultation responses [Archived]
  • Removing restrictions on where solicitors can practise
  • Changes to the SRA Principles and the Code of Conduct
  • Changes to the SRA Accounts Rules
  • Next steps

In June 2016, the SRA launched plans to 'radically' simplify the SRA Handbook. It published two initial consultation papers:

  1. Looking to the future: flexibility and public protection

  2. Looking to the future: SRA Accounts Rules Review

The two consultations set out proposals to:

  1. remove restrictions on where solicitors can practise and allow them to provide non-reserved activities to the public from businesses that are not regulated by the SRA or any other approved legal services regulator

  2. rewrite the SRA Principles and Code of Conduct (the Code), including splitting the Code into two separate documents, one for firms and one for individuals

  3. rewrite the SRA Accounts Rules

For more information on the 2016 consultations, see Practice Notes:

  1. Looking to the future: SRA proposals for reform of the Handbook [Archived]

  2. Looking to the future: SRA review of the Principles and Code of Conduct [Archived]

  3. Looking to the future: SRA review of the accounts rules [Archived]

Further consultations tackled the rest of the Handbook, including overseas rules, discipline and enforcement, authorisation and the practising framework.

In June 2017, the SRA (finally) published its responses to these first two consultations. This Practice Note summarises the SRA's responses.

Removing restrictions on where solicitors can practise

Under the 2011 Handbook, reserved activities like probate, advocacy, conveyancing and litigation can only be carried out by:

  1. a person or entity authorised by an