Long residence and private life—summary and resources
Produced in partnership with Helen Smith of North Star Law
Long residence and private life—summary and resources

The following Immigration guidance note Produced in partnership with Helen Smith of North Star Law provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Long residence and private life—summary and resources
  • Subject access requests
  • The meaning of ‘continuous residence’
  • The meaning of ‘lawful residence’
  • Evidencing continuous residence
  • Long residence—indefinite leave to remain applications
  • Long residence—further leave to remain applications
  • Various considerations for long residence applications
  • Private life—further leave to remain applications
  • Private life—duration and conditions of leave
  • more

The long residence and private life routes within the Immigration Rules are for those applying for further leave to remain or indefinite leave to remain (also referred as ILR) on the basis of the length of time they have spent living in the UK. There are currently no Practice Notes or Precedents dealing with the route on LexisNexis® Immigration, but the topic is scheduled for future development. In the meantime, we have set out a resource page below which includes a summary of the category, plus links to the relevant Immigration Rules, Home Office guidance, forms, fees and other application information.

The long residence route covers persons who have been lawfully in the UK for a continuous period of at least ten years. If they can meet the Knowledge of Language and Life in the UK (also referred to as KoLL) requirements, and there is no reason for the application to be refused under the general grounds of refusal, they can apply for indefinite leave to remain. The route was initially established (as a concession outside the Immigration Rules) to ensure that the UK met its obligations under the European Convention on Establishment 1955.

The private life route was introduced on 9 July 2012, and represents the government’s interpretation of the protection that the European Convention on Human Rights, Article 8 (Article 8