Local authority duties to looked after children in Wales
Produced in partnership with Matthew Wyard, Barrister of 3PB Barristers
Local authority duties to looked after children in Wales

The following Local Government practice note produced in partnership with Matthew Wyard, Barrister of 3PB Barristers provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Local authority duties to looked after children in Wales
  • Duties towards looked after children
  • Care Plans and LAC reviews
  • The Independent Reviewing Officer (the IRO)
  • Advice and assistance for young persons leaving care
  • Who is entitled to support?
  • Keeping in touch/personal advisers
  • Pathway assessments and plans
  • Specific duties owed to Category 3 young people
  • Specific obligations to Category 4 young people
  • More...

This is a Practice Note for lawyers working in, or for, Children’s Services departments within local authorities in Wales. It deals exclusively with the law that relates to Wales. For the law as it stands in England, regard should be had generally to: Local authority duties to children—overview and the Practice Notes referred to below.

It is the third of a series of three Practice Notes covering children’s social care in Wales. For guidance on child protection in Wales, see Practice Note: Local authority duties to children in Wales—child protection and for information in relation to providing accommodation for children, see Practice Note: Local authority powers and duties to provide accommodation for children in Wales.

Duties towards looked after children

Looked after children (LAC) in Wales are those subject to a care order, or those provided with accommodation pursuant to any of a local authority’s social services functions.

For information relating to local authority duties to LAC in England, see Practice Note: Local authority duties towards children looked after by them.

The principal duties upon local authorities towards LAC are:

  1. to safeguard and promote the child’s well-being

  2. make such use of services available for children cared for by their own parents as appears to the authority reasonable in the child's case

The duty to safeguard and promote a child’s well-being includes the duties to:

  1. promote the child’s educational achievements

  2. assess

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