Litigation funding—United Arab Emirates—Q&A guide [Archived]
Litigation funding—United Arab Emirates—Q&A guide [Archived]

The following Dispute Resolution practice note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Litigation funding—United Arab Emirates—Q&A guide [Archived]
  • 1. Is third-party litigation funding permitted? Is it commonly used?
  • 2. Are there limits on the fees and interest funders can charge?
  • 3. Are there any specific legislative or regulatory provisions applicable to third-party litigation funding?
  • 4. Do specific professional or ethical rules apply to lawyers advising clients in relation to third-party litigation funding?
  • 5. Do any public bodies have any particular interest in or oversight over third-party litigation funding?
  • 6. May third-party funders insist on their choice of counsel?
  • 7. May funders attend or participate in hearings and settlement proceedings?
  • 8. Do funders have veto rights in respect of settlements?
  • 9. In what circumstances may a funder terminate funding?
  • More...

Litigation funding—United Arab Emirates—Q&A guide [Archived]

This Practice Note contains a jurisdiction-specific Q&A guide to litigation funding in United Arab Emirates published as part of the Lexology Getting the Deal Through series by Law Business Research (published: November 2020).

Authors: Gowling WLG LLP—James Foster; Courtney Rothery; Jennifer Al-Salim

1. Is third-party litigation funding permitted? Is it commonly used?

There are a number of judicial authorities within the United Arab Emirates and it is necessary to look at each separately when considering third-party funding.

Commercial disputes arising in the United Arab Emirates will be resolved by the local civil law courts unless the parties have opted into another jurisdiction or signed a valid arbitration agreement.

The United Arab Emirates consists of seven emirates. ‘Local courts’ or ‘onshore courts’ (see below) refer generically to the courts of the seven emirates.

In addition, the United Arab Emirates has a number of free zones where companies can set up and do business under the rules of the free zone. These rules are different from those that apply to companies doing business elsewhere in the United Arab Emirates. Businesses located in the free zones are commonly referred to as being in ‘offshore’ United Arab Emirates, with areas outside the free zones being known as ‘onshore’ United Arab Emirates.

Two free zones in the United Arab Emirates have their own courts, the Dubai International Financial Centre (DIFC) and

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