Listed building heritage partnership agreements
Listed building heritage partnership agreements

The following Planning practice note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Listed building heritage partnership agreements
  • What is a Listed Building Heritage Partnership Agreement?
  • Why are HPAs used?
  • Duration of an HPA
  • Parties
  • Drafting the HPA
  • Model agreement
  • Procedure
  • Consultation and publicity
  • Consultation
  • More...

What is a Listed Building Heritage Partnership Agreement?

A Listed Building Heritage Partnership Agreement (HPA) is a non-statutory agreement between a local planning authority (LPA) and the owner of a listed building. It allows the LPA to grant listed building consent for the duration of the agreement for specified works of alteration or extension (but not demolition) of those listed buildings. See Practice Note: Listed building regime and listed building consent.

When considering whether to grant listed building consent in an HPA, LPAs must have special regard to the desirability of preserving the building or its setting or any features of special architectural or historic interest possessed by the listed building(s) to be included in the HPA and should take account of the relevant policies in the National Planning Policy Framework.

Why are HPAs used?

HPAs remove the need for the owner to submit repetitive applications for listed building consent for works.

Duration of an HPA

An HPA must provide for its termination. The duration of an HPA is a matter for the LPA and other parties to decide.

Government guidance recommends that a time limit is set to ensure that it 'continues to meet appropriate standards and principles for conservation, and continues to have regard to the special interest of the building'. A maximum length of 25 years is recommended to ensure the HPA keeps up to date with changing

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