Labour and employment—Thailand—Q&A guide

The following Employment practice note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Labour and employment—Thailand—Q&A guide
  • 1. What are the main statutes and regulations relating to employment?
  • 2. Is there any law prohibiting discrimination or harassment in employment? If so, what categories are regulated under the law?
  • 3. What are the primary government agencies or other entities responsible for the enforcement of employment statutes and regulations?
  • 4. Is there any legislation mandating or allowing the establishment of employees’ representatives in the workplace?
  • 5. What are their powers?
  • 6. Are there any restrictions or prohibitions against background checks on applicants? Does it make a difference if an employer conducts its own checks or hires a third party?
  • 7. Are there any restrictions or prohibitions against requiring a medical examination as a condition of employment?
  • 8. Are there any restrictions or prohibitions against drug and alcohol testing of applicants?
  • 9. Are there any legal requirements to give preference in hiring to, or not to discriminate against, particular people or groups of people?
  • More...

Labour and employment—Thailand—Q&A guide

This Practice Note contains a jurisdiction-specific Q&A guide to labour and employment in Thailand published as part of the Lexology Getting the Deal Through series by Law Business Research (published: April 2020).

Authors: Pisut & Partners—Pisut Rakwong; Wayu Suthisarnsuntorn

1. What are the main statutes and regulations relating to employment?

In Thailand, the main statutes and regulations related to employment are the:

  1. Civil and Commercial Code;

  2. Labour Relations Act 1975;

  3. Act on Establishment of the Labour Court and Labour Dispute Procedure 1979;

  4. Social Security Act 1990;

  5. Workmen Compensation Act 1994;

  6. Labour Protection Act 1998;

  7. Occupational Safety, Health and Environment Act 2011;

  8. Provident Fund Act 1987;

  9. Emergency Decree on Managing the Work of Aliens 2017; and

  10. Skill Development Promotion Act 2002.

2. Is there any law prohibiting discrimination or harassment in employment? If so, what categories are regulated under the law?

The Constitution prohibits discrimination based on nationality, age, gender, language, physical or social status, religion, education and political affiliation. The Labour Protection Act (LPA) prohibits discrimination in employment based on gender. Male and female employees must be treated equally except where equal treatment is impossible because of the nature of certain work. The LPA also limits the type of work that an employer can require female or child employees to do. For example, an employer is not allowed to:

  1. employ female workers to work in various

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