Judicial review time limits—extensions and urgent cases
Produced in partnership with Morayo Fagborun Bennett of Hardwicke Chambers
Judicial review time limits—extensions and urgent cases

The following Public Law practice note produced in partnership with Morayo Fagborun Bennett of Hardwicke Chambers provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Judicial review time limits—extensions and urgent cases
  • Time limits for bringing a judicial review claim
  • Acknowledgement of service
  • Response
  • Skeleton argument
  • Application for costs following settlement
  • Grounds for extension of time
  • Application for an extension of time in relation to any other time limits
  • Practical tips for the defendant to obtain an extension of time for filing an acknowledgement of service
  • Urgent cases (procedural tactics, likelihood of successful application for an extension of time and effect of proceedings)
  • More...

IP COMPLETION DAY: 11pm (GMT) on 31 December 2020 marks the end of the Brexit transition/implementation period entered into following the UK’s withdrawal from the EU. At this point in time (referred to in UK law as ‘IP completion day’), key transitional arrangements come to an end and significant changes begin to take effect across the UK’s legal regime. This document contains guidance on subjects impacted by these changes. Before continuing your research, see Practice Note: What does IP completion day mean for public law?

When a public body receives a claim form for judicial review, the first step is to consider whether the claim has been brought in time. For further guidance, see Practice Note: Judicial review—time limits and the pre-action protocol.

For information on specific developments, legislation and guidance relating to coronavirus (COVID-19) and judicial review, see Practice Note: Coronavirus (COVID-19)—judicial review tracker.

Time limits for bringing a judicial review claim

Different time limits apply for certain types of judicial review claim:

  1. judicial review of decision of the Upper Tribunal must be brought within 16 days of notice of the Tribunal’s decision being sent

  2. public procurement cases must be brought within 30 days of when a claimant knew, or ought to have known, of the alleged breach of the public procurement rules

  3. planning judicial reviews must be brought within 6 weeks of the grounds to make

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