Judgments and orders—service, compliance, interpretation
Judgments and orders—service, compliance, interpretation

The following Dispute Resolution practice note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Judgments and orders—service, compliance, interpretation
  • Serving court orders
  • When does a judgment or order take effect?
  • Complying with court orders
  • Interpretation of court orders
  • Court specific guidance

Judgments and orders—service, compliance, interpretation

This Practice Note provides guidance on the interpretation and application of the relevant provisions of the CPR. Depending on the court in which your matter is proceeding, you may also need to be mindful of additional provisions—see further below.

This Practice Note should be read in conjunction with Practice Notes: Relief from sanctions—when (and when not) to use and Relief from sanctions—the courts’ approach.

For information on varying, amending or setting aside judgments and orders, see Practice Notes:

  1. Varying or revoking orders—court's general power under CPR 3.1(7)

  2. Judgments and orders—correcting accidental errors under the slip rule (CPR 40.12)

  3. Judgments and orders—setting aside

  4. Amending judgments

For information on drawing up orders, see Practice Note: Judgments and orders—drafting and formalities—Drawing up orders.

Serving court orders

Where a party has drawn up a judgment or order to be filed by the court, the party must file enough copies for all parties to be served (CPR 40.4(1)). Unless the court directs otherwise, orders made otherwise than at trial must be served on the applicant, respondent and any other person the court directs (CPR 40.4(2)).

The court can require a judgment or order to be served on a party as well as their legal representative (CPR 40.5).

When serving an order it is worth thinking ahead to enforcement, particularly if there is a possibility you will need to enforce breach of the

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