Q&As

Is it still possible to reserve a right to hunt over land following the Hunting Act 2004 (which limits drag hunting) and how best can this right be reserved (eg by licence, lease of rights or profit a prendre)?

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Produced in partnership with Chris Bryden of 4 King’s Bench Walk
Published on LexisPSL on 29/03/2018

The following Property Q&A produced in partnership with Chris Bryden of 4 King’s Bench Walk provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Is it still possible to reserve a right to hunt over land following the Hunting Act 2004 (which limits drag hunting) and how best can this right be reserved (eg by licence, lease of rights or profit a prendre)?

Is it still possible to reserve a right to hunt over land following the Hunting Act 2004 (which limits drag hunting) and how best can this right be reserved (eg by licence, lease of rights or profit a prendre)?

A right to hunt falls within the class of sporting rights that are traditionally reserved by way of a profit a prendre in the event that a separate registered interest is to be created. Alternatively, rights can be licensed or leased by deed, and much depends on what is desired in terms of the ability to pass on those rights, their extent and their terminability.

A profit a prendre is the right to do something on land and to take something from that land—for example, the right to fish on land belonging to another, and to take from that land the fish caught. At law, an individual is not able to own a wild

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