Introduction to framework agreements and dynamic purchasing systems
Produced in partnership with Lee Digings of Lee Digings Associates
Introduction to framework agreements and dynamic purchasing systems

The following Public Law practice note produced in partnership with Lee Digings of Lee Digings Associates provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Introduction to framework agreements and dynamic purchasing systems
  • Brexit impact—public procurement
  • Public Contracts Regulations 2015
  • What is a framework agreement?
  • What are the main features and requirements of framework agreements under the PCR 2015?
  • What is a dynamic purchasing system?
  • What are the main features and requirements of dynamic purchasing systems under PCR 2015?
  • Major government framework agreements and dynamic purchasing systems

IP COMPLETION DAY: 11pm (GMT) on 31 December 2020 marks the end of the Brexit transition/implementation period entered into following the UK’s withdrawal from the EU. At this point in time (referred to in UK law as ‘IP completion day’), key transitional arrangements come to an end and significant changes begin to take effect across the UK’s legal regime. This document contains guidance on subjects impacted by these changes. Before continuing your research, see Practice Note: What does IP completion day mean for public law?

Brexit impact—public procurement

The UK public procurement regime derives from EU public procurement laws, and is therefore impacted by the UK’s withdrawal from the EU. For general updates on the process and preparations for Brexit, see: Brexit timeline. For further reading on the impact of Brexit on public procurement, see Practice Note: Brexit—the implications for public procurement.

Public Contracts Regulations 2015

Under the Public Contracts Regulations 2015 (PCR 2015), certain public bodies must comply with various regulations governing the offer and entry into contracts. The relevant public bodies are defined as 'contracting authorities' in regulation 2(1) of the PCR 2015. For background reading, see Practice Note: Introduction to public contracts procurement—Contracting authorities.

Contracting authorities must not design a procurement process with the intention of excluding it from the scope of the PCR 2015 or artificially narrowing competition. For this purpose, competition is artificially narrowed

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