Improving personal resilience
Produced in partnership with Beth Pipe of Bellis Learning Solutions Ltd
Improving personal resilience

The following Local Government guidance note Produced in partnership with Beth Pipe of Bellis Learning Solutions Ltd provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Improving personal resilience
  • What is personal resilience?
  • Tackling the root of resilience
  • Why does everyone else appear to be coping?
  • The scientific approach
  • Getting to grips with 'learned helplessness'
  • Other areas of support

Working within the public sector at the moment is rather like going for a paddle in a rough sea—a wave of change comes along and nearly sweeps you off your feet but, before you’ve regained your balance, the next wave is bearing down on you. This Practice Note will help you identify what you are currently doing that is helping and hindering your personal resilience when dealing with these waves of change and offer a number of practical tips for dealing with ongoing change.

  1. What is personal resilience?

  2. Tackling the root of resilience

  3. Why does everyone else appear to be coping?

  4. The scientific approach

  5. Getting to grips with 'learned helplessness'

  6. Other areas of support

What is personal resilience?

The internet offers the following definition:

Psychological resilience is defined as an individual's ability to properly adapt to stress and adversity. Stress and adversity can come in the shape of family or relationship problems, health problems, or workplace and financial worries, among others. (Wikipedia)

This is where the first challenge arises—though this Practice Note is focusing on building your resilience in the workplace the reality for most of us is that there will be additional factors from outside work that are also having an effect on our ability to cope.

Resilience involves a combination of personal characteristics and skills—these skills are practical