Implementing a mediation scheme—an interview with Emma Langford
Implementing a mediation scheme—an interview with Emma Langford

The following In-House Advisor guidance note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Implementing a mediation scheme—an interview with Emma Langford
  • Tell us a bit about your background and the business
  • Can you tell us about the mediation project you’ve been working on?
  • How did you decide what you wanted from the scheme?
  • How important are the qualifications of the mediators?
  • How are you planning to implement the project?
  • What are the key outcomes you hope to achieve?
  • How do you plan to review the scheme internally? What metrics will you use to measure its impact?

Dealing with customer claims in court can be both expensive and time-consuming. We talk to Emma Langford, Head of Legal at Thomas Cook Group Airlines, about the process of implementing a mediation scheme and the potential benefits it can bring to a business and its customers.

Tell us a bit about your background and the business

I have been with the Thomas Cook Group for nearly 12 years, having joined as a junior corporate/commercial lawyer from private practice. While in private practice, I was seconded to a client as their sole in-house lawyer—I was a 2PQE solicitor covering for someone with eight years’ experience. It was a huge challenge but I loved it and it made me realise that in-house was for me.

I’m currently Head of Legal for all the airlines in the Thomas Cook Group. I cover the UK, German, Belgian and Scandinavian airlines and my legal team is based across these four jurisdictions. Previously, I was Head of Legal for the UK airline. Moving to the Group Airlines role was a big change in terms of transitioning from an English law, UK focused team to a multi-cultural, multi-language team. The challenge is to get everyone to think of themselves as one team and to act that way.

There are around 20 people in my team and we focus on