Health and safety in the offshore oil and gas sector—safety case regime
Health and safety in the offshore oil and gas sector—safety case regime

The following Environment guidance note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Health and safety in the offshore oil and gas sector—safety case regime
  • Background and purpose
  • Overview
  • Installation Operator and Well Operator
  • Licensees
  • Competent authority
  • Preparation of the Safety Case
  • Appointment of an Offshore Installation Manager
  • Permit to work system
  • Corporate Major Accident Prevention Policy (CMAPP)
  • more

Background and purpose

In addition to the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974 there is a further set of regulations which applies to owners and operators of offshore oil and gas installations. Together these regulations state what must go into a document called the ‘Safety Case’.

The offshore safety case regime arose out of recommendations made during the Cullen Review following the Piper Alpha Disaster on 6th July 1988. It remains the highest death toll in any accident in the history of UK offshore operations, where 167 men died in an explosion and fire which totally destroyed the installation and caused it to fall into the sea. Only 62 men survived; many with serious burns and other injuries caused by jumping into the sea. Following the incident a Public Inquiry was held to establish the circumstances of the accident and its causes. A Scottish Judge, Lord Cullen, was appointed to provide a report and make recommendations with a view to the preservation of life and the avoidance of similar accidents in the future.

The Cullen Report was published in 1990 and led to a fundamental change to the way in which health and safety was regulated on offshore installations. The Safety Case Regulations and other regulations were introduced between 1992 and 1996, with the Safety Case Regulations being further