HCPC—Postponement and adjournment of proceedings and proceeding in the absence of a registrant
Produced in partnership with Paul Renteurs of 2 Hare Court
HCPC—Postponement and adjournment of proceedings and proceeding in the absence of a registrant

The following Corporate Crime practice note produced in partnership with Paul Renteurs of 2 Hare Court provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • HCPC—Postponement and adjournment of proceedings and proceeding in the absence of a registrant
  • HCPC postponement and adjournment of proceedings and proceeding in the absence of a registrant
  • Postponements and adjournments
  • HCPC postponements—the procedure
  • HCPC adjournments—the procedure
  • Communication
  • Supporting evidence
  • Proceeding in the absence of the registrant—exercise of discretion
  • HCPC procedure for hearing in absence of the registrant

This Practice Note explains Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) postponement and adjournment of proceedings and proceeding in the absence of a registrant during fitness to practice hearings before the Health and Care Professionals Tribunal (HCPT). Note that the regulation of social workers in England transferred from the HCPC to Social Work England on 2 December 2019, see: LNB News 02/12/2019 29.

HCPC postponement and adjournment of proceedings and proceeding in the absence of a registrant

Fitness to practise proceedings must be conducted expeditiously as it is in the interest of all parties, and the wider public interest, that allegations are heard and resolved as quickly as possible. Where a time and venue for a hearing have been set, the HCPT which conducts the hearing should always aim to proceed as quickly as possible.

Proceedings should not be postponed or adjourned unless it is shown that failing to do so will create a potential injustice. Requests for postponements or adjournments made without sufficient demonstrated reasons to justify them will not be granted.

As a general principle, a registrant who is facing a fitness to practise allegation has a right to be present and represented at a hearing. However, the procedural rules for such hearings provide that if a registrant is neither present nor represented, the HCPT may nevertheless proceed if it is satisfied that all reasonable steps have

Popular documents