Group Litigation Orders in relation to financial services disputes
Produced in partnership with Tony Watts of Keystone Law
Group Litigation Orders in relation to financial services disputes

The following Financial Services guidance note Produced in partnership with Tony Watts of Keystone Law provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Group Litigation Orders in relation to financial services disputes
  • Origins of Group Litigation Orders (GLOs)
  • What is a GLO?
  • Content of a GLO
  • Binding effect of a GLO
  • Case management
  • Costs
  • Practice Direction 19B (PD)
  • Relevant case law
  • Other forms of multi-party action
  • more

Origins of Group Litigation Orders (GLOs)

GLOs were introduced in the Civil Procedure Rules (CPRs) 2000 following recommendations by Lord Woolf in his report on Access to Justice (1996). The objective was to provide means of achieving justice in cases involving multiple claimants or defendants (including those where individual loss is too small to justify individual action).

GLOs provide an opt-in procedure. Proposals to introduce opt-in or opt-out means of group litigation in the Financial Services Act 2012 were not carried into effect.

What is a GLO?

A GLO is an order made to provide for the case management of claims which give rise to common or related issues of fact or law (the ‘GLO issues’).

A court can make a GLO where there are or are likely to be a number of claims giving rise to the GLO issues.

A GLO may be made on the application of claimants or defendants or on the initiative of the court. An application may be made before or after proceedings have commenced.

A GLO may be made by any court but only with the consent of the Lord Chief Justice (in the case of claims proceeding in the Queen’s Bench Division) or the Vice-Chancellor(in the case of claims proceeding in the Chancery Division) or the Head of Civil Justice in the case of claims