Green belt and green wedge policy in Wales
Produced in partnership with Stephen Morgan of Landmark Chambers
Green belt and green wedge policy in Wales

The following Property guidance note Produced in partnership with Stephen Morgan of Landmark Chambers provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Green belt and green wedge policy in Wales
  • Introduction
  • Difference in general approach to ‘green’ area protection in England and Wales
  • Green belt and green wedge policy in Wales
  • The effect of the Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015

Introduction

The planning systems in England and Wales have become increasingly distinct in recent years, both in terms of policy and legislation. The diversification began in 2000 with the formation of the Welsh Assembly Government (as it was then called). The Wales Act 1998 devolved most planning matters, though it was not until the second devolution referendum in 2011 that the Welsh Government was granted primary legislative powers, one result of which was the Planning (Wales) Act 2015, which has increased still further the distinction between Welsh planning law and that of the rest of the UK.

Welsh planning policy since March 2002 has been laid down in Planning Policy Wales (PPW). This overarching policy document is supplemented by a series of 23 detailed Technical Advice Notes (TANs) and other guidance. See Practice Note: Planning policy in Wales.

Difference in general approach to ‘green’ area protection in England and Wales

In England the concept of green wedges (sometimes referred to as ‘green barriers’) is not a part of national policy. Chapter 13 of the National Planning Policy Framework in England entitled ‘Protecting Green Belt Land’ makes no mention of green wedges at all. Thus, while green belt protection is a matter of national policy in both jurisdictions, only in Wales is green wedge protection formulated as a national policy