Government relations—European Union—Q&A guide
Government relations—European Union—Q&A guide

The following Public Law practice note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Government relations—European Union—Q&A guide
  • 1. What is the basic source of law? Describe the scope of, and limitations on, government power relevant to the regulation of lobbying and government relations.
  • 2. Describe the legislative system as it relates to lobbying.
  • 3. Describe the extent to which a legislative or rule-making authority relevant to lobbying practice also exists at regional, provincial or municipal level.
  • 4. Does the legislative process at national or subnational level include a formal consultation process? What opportunities or access points are typically available to influence legislation?
  • 5. Is the judiciary deemed independent and co-equal? Are judges elected or appointed? If judges are elected, are campaigns financed through public appropriation or candidate fundraising?
  • 6. Is lobbying self-regulated by the industry, or is it regulated by the government, legislature or an independent regulator? What are the regulator’s powers? Who may issue guidance on lobbying? What powers of investigation does the regulator have? What are the regulators’ or other officials’ powers to penalise violators?
  • 7. Is there a definition or other guidance as to what constitutes lobbying?
  • 8. Is there voluntary or mandatory registration of lobbyists? How else is lobbying disclosed?
  • 9. What communications must be disclosed or registered?
  • More...

Government relations—European Union—Q&A guide

This Practice Note contains a jurisdiction-specific Q&A guide to government relations in European Union published as part of the Lexology Getting the Deal Through series by Law Business Research (published: May 2021).

Authors: Loyens & Loeff—Valentijn De Boe; Joren Vuylsteke

1. What is the basic source of law? Describe the scope of, and limitations on, government power relevant to the regulation of lobbying and government relations.

The basic sources of EU law are the Treaty on the EU (TEU) and the Treaty on the Functioning of the EU (TFEU).

In carrying out their missions, EU administrations must be open, efficient and independent.

The EU institutions must give representative associations the opportunity to make known and publicly exchange their views in all areas of EU action as well as to maintain an open, transparent and regular dialogue with these associations. The European Commission has, in addition, the obligation to carry out broad consultations with parties concerned to ensure that the EU's actions are coherent and transparent.

2. Describe the legislative system as it relates to lobbying.

EU decision-making is the result of interaction between the European Parliament, the Council of the EU and the European Commission. The European Parliament is composed of representatives of the EU citizens, who elect them directly. The Council consists of one representative per member state at the ministerial level. The Commission is the executive

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