GOC—Fitness to Practise hearing—the impairment stage
Produced in partnership with Jonas Milne & Sandesh Singh of 2 Bedford Row
GOC—Fitness to Practise hearing—the impairment stage

The following Corporate Crime practice note produced in partnership with Jonas Milne & Sandesh Singh of 2 Bedford Row provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • GOC—Fitness to Practise hearing—the impairment stage
  • The impairment stage
  • Insight

Coronavirus (COVID-19): This Practice Note contains guidance on subjects impacted by the government’s response to the COVID-19 outbreak. In particular, the General Optical Council (Committee Constitution, Registration and Fitness to Practise) (Coronavirus) (Amendment) Rules Order of Council 2020, SI 2020/1325 amends the General Optical Council (Fitness to Practise) Rules 2013, SI 2013/2537 to provide for the Hearings Manager to postpone and relist hearings, to enable notices to be sent by email, if an email address has been provided for communication, and to allow for hearings to be held by audio or video conference. These amendments expire at the end of 1 October 2021. For updates on COVID-19 key developments and related practical guidance on the implications for lawyers, see: Coronavirus (COVID-19) and the criminal justice system—overview and Coronavirus (COVID-19) toolkit.

The impairment stage

If the charge or charges against the Registrant are proved, the Fitness to Practice Committee panel will go on to consider the issue of impairment. A finding of impaired fitness to practise against a registered individual can be based on any of the following:

  1. misconduct

  2. deficient professional performance (although not in the case of a registered student)

  3. a conviction or caution in the UK for a criminal offence, or a conviction elsewhere for an offence, which, if committed in England and Wales, would constitute a criminal offence

  4. adverse physical or mental health, or

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