Gas regulation—Italy—Q&A guide

The following Energy practice note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Gas regulation—Italy—Q&A guide
  • 1. Describe the domestic natural gas sector, including the natural gas production, liquefied natural gas (LNG) storage, pipeline transportation, distribution, commodity sales and trading segments and retail sales and usage.
  • 2. What percentage of the country’s energy needs is met directly or indirectly with natural gas and LNG? What percentage of the country’s natural gas needs is met through domestic production and imported production?
  • 3. What is the government’s policy for the domestic natural gas sector and which bodies set it?
  • 4. Which authorities make regulatory policies and decisions in respect of the production, transmission, distribution and supply of natural gas?
  • 5. What is the ownership and organisational structure for production of natural gas (other than LNG)? How does the government derive value from natural gas production?
  • 6. Describe the statutory and regulatory framework and any relevant authorisations applicable to natural gas exploration and production.
  • 7. Are there different rules for, or any restrictions on, unconventional natural gas production (including fracking)?
  • 8. Are participants required to provide security or any guarantees to be issued with a licence to explore for or to store gas?
  • 9. Describe in general the ownership of natural gas pipeline transportation, and storage infrastructure.
  • More...

Gas regulation—Italy—Q&A guide

This Practice Note contains a jurisdiction-specific Q&A guide to gas regulation in Italy published as part of the Lexology Getting the Deal Through series by Law Business Research (published: May 2021).

Authors: CMS Italy—Pietro Cavasola; Matteo Ciminelli

1. Describe the domestic natural gas sector, including the natural gas production, liquefied natural gas (LNG) storage, pipeline transportation, distribution, commodity sales and trading segments and retail sales and usage.

Directive 2003/55/EC provided for the definitive opening of EU member states' gas markets to competition, and therefore helped Italy to create a true internal gas market. Regarding access to the market, a gradual approach has been adopted in opening the sector to competing companies. Measures have been put in place to protect users' interests and allow them to exercise the right to choose their gas supplier. The principles stated in Directive 2003/55 have been further developed by Directive 2009/73/EC, which repealed Directive 2003/55 and introduced new rules aimed at accomplishing a more effective unbundling of companies active in the transmission, storage and distribution of gas. The unbundling of companies involved in the energy sector is a key part of the Third Energy Package, a new set of regulations issued by EC bodies. It mainly means the effective legal and functional separation of network activities from supply and production activities to ensure competitiveness among companies in an open and

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