Franchise—Norway—Q&A guide

The following Commercial practice note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Franchise—Norway—Q&A guide
  • 1. How widespread is franchising in your jurisdiction? In which sectors is franchising common? Are there any economic or regulatory issues in the market that are more or less hospitable to franchising or make it economically viable in your jurisdiction?
  • 2. Are there any national or local franchise associations? What is their role in franchising, including any impact on laws or regulations? Are there any rules of conduct or membership requirements?
  • 3. What forms of business entities are relevant to the typical franchisor?
  • 4. What laws and agencies govern the formation of business entities?
  • 5. Provide an overview of the requirements for forming and maintaining a business entity.
  • 6. What restrictions apply to foreign business entities and foreign investment?
  • 7. What aspects of the tax system are relevant to franchisors? How are foreign businesses and individuals taxed?
  • 8. Are there any relevant labour and employment considerations for typical franchisors?
  • 9. How are trademarks and other intellectual property and know-how protected?
  • More...

Franchise—Norway—Q&A guide

This Practice Note contains a jurisdiction-specific Q&A guide to franchise in Norway published as part of the Lexology Getting the Deal Through series by Law Business Research (published: September 2021).

Authors: CLP—Eline Thorsrud; Kjetil Vagen

1. How widespread is franchising in your jurisdiction? In which sectors is franchising common? Are there any economic or regulatory issues in the market that are more or less hospitable to franchising or make it economically viable in your jurisdiction?

Franchising is a common way of organising chains within certain sectors in Norway. The sectors with the highest use of franchising are the retail and food industry, more specifically:

  1. the food sector including cafés, restaurants and similar establishments;

  2. specialist trade, such as construction materials, paint and furnishing;

  3. services, such as healthcare, accounting and safety products;

  4. textiles and shoes; and

  5. grocery stores, convenience stores and fuel stations.

Other sectors that use franchising are hotels, opticians, jewellers, gyms, health and wellbeing centres, hairdressers, beauty salons, and car accessories and tyres.

There are no specific economic or regulatory issues in the market for franchising as opposed to other ways of organising chains.

2. Are there any national or local franchise associations? What is their role in franchising, including any impact on laws or regulations? Are there any rules of conduct or membership requirements?

There are no national or local franchise associations in Norway.

3. What forms of business entities

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