Formulating your firm's approach to pro bono
Produced in partnership with Joanna Kennedy of The Zacchaeus 2000 Trust (Z2K)

The following Practice Management practice note produced in partnership with Joanna Kennedy of The Zacchaeus 2000 Trust (Z2K) provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Formulating your firm's approach to pro bono
  • Planning your approach
  • Values and ethics
  • Goals
  • Key stakeholders
  • Financial and human resources
  • Key elements of a pro bono policy
  • Pro bono mission statement
  • Law Society support for pro bono

Formulating your firm's approach to pro bono

Planning your approach

If your firm's chosen approach to pro bono is to succeed it needs to have internal support. To get this, the plan should be relevant to your business and should derive from, and be closely aligned with, your firm’s overall strategic plans. You should therefore check your business plan before putting together a business case for pro bono as you will need to gather some key information from it to help inform your approach, eg:

Information neededWhy is this information needed?
What are the firm's values and ethics?To assess how a pro bono policy and programme can help your firm to demonstrate its established values and ethics
What are the firm's goals?A pro bono policy and programme should help your firm achieve some or all of its goals—if it does not do this it is unlikely to be worth pursuing
Who are the firm's key stakeholders?Your stakeholder's interests may influence the type of pro bono work undertaken
What financial and human resources are available?There is no point in implementing a pro bono policy and planning an exhaustive programme of works if there is no financial or human resource available to do it

The importance of each of these pieces of information is discussed below.

You should also consider whether you want to:

  1. undertake pro bono work

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