Formulating a learning and development—L&D—policy
Produced in partnership with Beth Pipe of Bellis Learning Solutions Ltd
Formulating a learning and development—L&D—policy

The following Practice Management guidance note Produced in partnership with Beth Pipe of Bellis Learning Solutions Ltd provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Formulating a learning and development—L&D—policy
  • What is an L&D policy?
  • Who is responsible for the L&D policy?
  • L&D policy—regulatory and statutory requirements
  • Identifying the content and scope of the policy and initial priorities
  • Identifying the aims of the policy
  • Alignment with other business objectives
  • Drafting the L&D policy
  • Implementing an L&D policy
  • Reviewing the L&D policy

This Practice Note provides information on formulating a learning and development (L&D) policy. It reviews key issues to consider including:

  1. what is an L&D policy

  2. who is responsible for the L&D policy

  3. regulatory or statutory requirements that must be complied with

  4. identifying the content and scope of the policy

  5. identifying the aims of the policy

  6. how to develop, draft and implement the L&D policy

  7. alignment with other business objectives

  8. reviewing the L&D policy

The SRA requirements relating to training contracts are outside the scope of this Practice Note.

What is an L&D policy?

An L&D policy outlines the firm's viewpoint for the development of its employees. It generally covers areas such as the firm's training standards, scope, priorities and how employees access L&D.

An L&D policy is different from an L&D plan which is a strategic document setting out how L&D can help a business meet its objectives. See Practice Note: Learning and development plans.

L&D policies are unique to the organisation and can be influenced by a wide number of variables including:

  1. its strategic objectives

  2. accreditations to external bodies such as Lexcel or Investors in People (IIP)

  3. the size of the firm

  4. traditions and culture of the firm

  5. the economic climate

  6. recruitment policies, eg the difference between lateral hires or focusing on internal growth and promotion

  7. the views of the senior management team