European Insurance and Occupational Pensions Authority (EIOPA)
Produced in partnership with Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe (Europe) LLP

The following Financial Services practice note produced in partnership with Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe (Europe) LLP provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • European Insurance and Occupational Pensions Authority (EIOPA)
  • What does EIOPA do?
  • Supervisory responsibilities
  • Organisation and structure of EIOPA
  • Board of supervisors
  • Management board
  • Chairperson
  • Executive director
  • Review panel
  • Stakeholder groups
  • More...

European Insurance and Occupational Pensions Authority (EIOPA)

What does EIOPA do?

The European Insurance and Occupational Pensions Authority (EIOPA) is one of three European Supervisory Authorities (ESAs) which was created to strengthen the EU supervisory framework and to reduce the risk and damage of a future financial crisis. It operates as an independent advisory body to the European Parliament, the Council of the European Union (the Council) and the European Commission (the Commission).

EIOPA is the European micro-prudential supervisor for the insurance and occupational pensions sectors. It was created by Regulation (EU) No 1094/2010 (the EIOPA regulation) and replaced the Committee of European Insurance and Occupational Pensions Supervisors (CEIOPS) in January 2011. It is based in Frankfurt, Germany.

EIOPA's main goals are:

  1. protecting consumers and rebuilding trust in the financial system

  2. ensuring a high, effective and consistent level of regulation and supervision, taking account of the varying interests of all EU Member States and the different nature of financial institutions

  3. greater harmonisation and coherent application of rules for financial institutions and markets across the EU

  4. strengthening oversight of cross-border groups, and

  5. promoting a coordinated EU supervisory response

EIOPA's core responsibilities are to:

  1. support the stability of the financial system

  2. support the transparency of the markets and financial products

  3. protect policyholders, pension scheme members and beneficiaries, and

  4. monitor and identify trends, risks and vulnerabilities at the micro-prudential

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