European Insurance and Occupational Pensions Authority (EIOPA)
Produced in partnership with Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe (Europe) LLP
European Insurance and Occupational Pensions Authority (EIOPA)

The following Financial Services guidance note Produced in partnership with Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe (Europe) LLP provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • European Insurance and Occupational Pensions Authority (EIOPA)
  • What does EIOPA do?
  • Organisation and structure of EIOPA
  • What is the relationship between EIOPA and other ESAs?
  • What is the interaction between EIOPA and UK authorities?

BREXIT: As of exit day (31 January 2020) the UK is no longer an EU Member State. However, in accordance with the Withdrawal Agreement, the UK has entered an implementation period, during which it continues to be subject to EU law. This has an impact on this Practice Note. For further guidance on the impact of Brexit on the European Insurance and Occupational Pensions Authority (EIOPA), see Practice Note: Preparing for Brexit: Regulations relating to the European Supervisory Authorities and the European Systemic Risk Board and Information Sharing–—quick guide.

What does EIOPA do?

The European Insurance and Occupational Pensions Authority (EIOPA) is one of three European Supervisory Authorities (ESAs) which was created to strengthen the EU supervisory framework and to reduce the risk and damage of a future financial crisis. It operates as an independent advisory body to the European Parliament, the Council of the European Union (the Council) and the European Commission (the Commission).

EIOPA is the European micro-prudential supervisor for the insurance and occupational pensions sectors. It replaced the Committee of European Insurance and Occupational Pensions Supervisors (CEIOPS) in January 2011.

EIOPA's main goals are:

  1. protecting consumers and rebuilding trust in the financial system

  2. ensuring a high, effective and consistent level of regulation and supervision, taking account of the varying interests of all EU Member States and the