Establishing and managing a care regime for a protected person
Produced in partnership with Thomson Snell & Passmore
Establishing and managing a care regime for a protected person

The following Private Client guidance note Produced in partnership with Thomson Snell & Passmore provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Establishing and managing a care regime for a protected person
  • The role of a case manager
  • Gratuitous family care payments
  • Agency care
  • Direct employment
  • Recruitment
  • Employment law
  • Managing a care team
  • Pensions
  • Conclusion

Deputies appointed in respect of a protected party’s (P’s) property and affairs are frequently involved in the establishment of a care regime.

Although a property and affairs deputy does not have either the authority or, necessarily, the expertise to make decisions on P’s behalf in respect of their care and welfare, they are still involved directly in matters relating to P’s care.

Depending on the nature and severity of P’s disabilities, a deputy can be involved in the coordination and funding of a variety of different care packages. These can range from a 24/7 professional nursing care package with a large team of carers to the involvement of a single support worker who supports P in certain tasks for a couple of hours a week.

The terms ‘carer’ and ‘support worker’ are used throughout these notes. However, regardless of whether the services of a carer or a support worker are commissioned by the deputy, the same matters will need to be considered and thereafter addressed.

The professional expertise of a case manager is essential to not only help determine what is required clinically to meet P’s needs, but also on a practical level to assist in putting agreed arrangements in place.

To ensure that funds are administered in accordance with P’s best interests, the deputy must work closely with the case manager.

When a case manager is