Equality Act 2010—discrimination in schools
Produced in partnership with Katie Michelon of Browne Jacobson Solicitors and Nicholas Hancox of Nicholas Hancox Solicitors
Equality Act 2010—discrimination in schools

The following Local Government guidance note Produced in partnership with Katie Michelon of Browne Jacobson Solicitors and Nicholas Hancox of Nicholas Hancox Solicitors provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Equality Act 2010—discrimination in schools
  • The public sector equality duty
  • Discrimination—classification and complaints
  • Sex, pregnancy and maternity discrimination
  • Race discrimination
  • Discrimination on grounds of religion or belief
  • Age discrimination
  • Marriage and civil partnership discrimination
  • Disability discrimination
  • DfE guidance

The public sector equality duty

Under the Equality Act 2010 (Specific Duties and Public Authorities) Regulations 2017, SI 2017/353, particular duties are imposed on public authorities with education functions. These authorities are required to publish information to demonstrate their compliance with the public sector equality duty under section 149 of the Equality Act 2010 (EqA 2010). This is due at yearly intervals. See Practice Notes: Specific public sector equality duties—England and Specific public sector equality duties—Wales. The public authorities in question include:

  1. a county council or district council in England

  2. the governing body of an educational establishment maintained by an English local authority (within the meaning of section 162 of the Education and Inspections Act 2006 (EIA 2006))

  3. a local authority with respect to the pupil referral units it establishes and maintains by virtue of section 19 of the Education Act 1996 (EA 1996)

  4. the proprietor of a City Technology College, City College for Technology or the Arts, or an Academy. (This includes the proprietor of a Free School)

Discrimination—classification and complaints

Discrimination under EqA 2010 can be direct (under EqA 2010, s 13) or indirect (under EqA 2010, s 19), harassment is also prohibited (in EqA 2010, s 26) and victimisation (in EqA 2010, s 27). But the ways in which discrimination, harassment and victimisation might become illegal