Environmental consultants—instructing consultants to peer review an environmental report
Produced in partnership with Argyll Environmental Ltd
Environmental consultants—instructing consultants to peer review an environmental report

The following Environment guidance note Produced in partnership with Argyll Environmental Ltd provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Environmental consultants—instructing consultants to peer review an environmental report
  • What is an environmental report?
  • Why is peer review undertaken?
  • What should the review cover?
  • Structure of environmental reports
  • Who should conduct the review?
  • Scope of review
  • Format of the review

What is an environmental report?

Environmental reports are normally undertaken to assess the environmental risks and liabilities at a site. They may be commissioned for various reasons, including:

  1. as part of the due diligence process on behalf of the buyer or seller of a property or corporate transaction

  2. regulatory action, or

  3. ongoing environmental management by operators/owners

See Practice Note: Environmental investigations—intrusive site investigations.

Environmental reports may include:

  1. contaminated land assessments (desktop, Phase I, Phase II and remediation)

  2. flood risk assessments

  3. ground stability appraisals

  4. asbestos surveys

The level of data, analysis and assessment required is determined by the likelihood and magnitude of the risk associated with any given site. An environmental consultant can advise on the type of environmental report required.

See Practice Note: Environmental investigations—types of searches and investigations.

Why is peer review undertaken?

Environmental consultants may present the results of their investigations differently depending on their instructions and who they are acting for. For example, an environmental consultant is likely to be more risk averse when working for a buyer, as opposed to a vendor.

Therefore, anyone seeking to rely on a report prepared for someone else may wish to instruct another consultant to review the report for their purposes.

In addition, where a report is relied on by one party in litigation, the opposing party may wish