Enforcing arbitral awards in France
Produced in partnership with Xavier Nyssen, partner, and Emile Hu, associate, international arbitration, Dechert LLP

The following Arbitration practice note produced in partnership with Xavier Nyssen, partner, and Emile Hu, associate, international arbitration, Dechert LLP provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Enforcing arbitral awards in France
  • French legal framework
  • Conditions for recognition and enforcement of international arbitral awards in France
  • French courts favour enforcement—difficulties resisting enforcement in France
  • Methods of enforcement

Enforcing arbitral awards in France

This Practice Note sets out the procedure for obtaining the recognition and enforcement of an international arbitration award through French courts.

Note: the French cases referred to below are not reported by LexisNexis® UK.

French legal framework

France is considered one of the most arbitration-friendly jurisdictions in the world. Its legal framework is highly favourable to the recognition and enforcement of international arbitral awards, ie international awards rendered in France and awards rendered abroad.

To enforce an award rendered abroad implies a two-prong process, ie recognition on the one hand and execution on the other. Recognition comes first and implies recognition from French courts of arbitral awards. Execution follows and requires an enforcement order, which may involve the use of the state’s sovereign powers.

The French legal framework governing the recognition and enforcement of international arbitral awards is based on case law, legislation and the 1958 Convention on Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards (the New York Convention) which came into force in France on 24 September 1959. Many of the provisions of the New York Convention were incorporated into the French Code of Civil Procedure (CCP). However, France’s liberal stance regarding the recognition and enforcement of international arbitral awards goes beyond the framework of the New York Convention.

French statutory provisions regarding arbitration are found in Book IV of the CCP, which includes Title

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