Enforcement of consumer protection laws under the Consumer Rights Act 2015
Produced in partnership with Helen Simm of Browne Jacobson
Enforcement of consumer protection laws under the Consumer Rights Act 2015

The following Corporate Crime practice note produced in partnership with Helen Simm of Browne Jacobson provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Enforcement of consumer protection laws under the Consumer Rights Act 2015
  • Background to the introduction of the Consumer Rights Act 2015
  • Enforcers with access to the generic set of investigatory powers under CRA 2015
  • The generic powers for consumer law enforcement
  • Power to require information
  • Limitations on the use of the power to require information
  • Powers available when entering the traders' premises
  • Power to make test purchases acting as a consumer
  • Power to observe the carrying on of a business acting as a consumer
  • Power of entry without warrant
  • More...

IP COMPLETION DAY: 11pm (GMT) on 31 December 2020 marks the end of the Brexit transition/implementation period entered into following the UK’s withdrawal from the EU. At this point in time (referred to in UK law as ‘IP completion day’), key transitional arrangements come to an end and significant changes begin to take effect across the UK’s legal regime. This document contains guidance on subjects impacted by these changes. Before continuing your research, see Practice Note: What does IP completion day mean for corporate crime?

BREXIT: As of exit day (31 January 2020), the UK is no longer an EU Member State. However, in accordance with the Withdrawal Agreement, the UK has entered an implementation period, during which it continues to be subject to EU law. For further guidance, see Practice Note: Brexit—introduction to the Withdrawal Agreement and Impact of Brexit on enforcement under CRA 2015 below.

Background to the introduction of the Consumer Rights Act 2015

Prior to statutory reform in 2015, regulation and enforcement of consumer protection law was piecemeal, spanning some sixty discrete pieces of legislation which delegated enforcement powers to a number of public bodies to act as enforcers.

The government carried out a review of published reports by the Public Accounts Committee in November 2011, proposals made by the Department of Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) (now the Department for Business, Energy and

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