Energy performance certificates (EPCs)—what are they and when are they required?
Energy performance certificates (EPCs)—what are they and when are they required?

The following Environment guidance note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Energy performance certificates (EPCs)—what are they and when are they required?
  • Brexit impact
  • What is an Energy Performance Certificate (EPC)?
  • EPC regulations
  • When is an EPC required?
  • What is a 'building'?
  • Buildings that don't need an EPC
  • EPC required—sale or letting
  • EPC required—construction or refurbishment
  • Displaying an EPC
  • more

This Practice Note explains how energy performance in buildings is regulated through Energy Performance Certificates (EPCs), when EPCs are needed, requirements under the key regulations governing EPCs — the Energy Performance of Buildings (England and Wales) Regulations 2012, SI 2012/3118 (EPC Regs 2012) and the Building Regulations 2010, SI 2010/2214 (Building Regs 2010), which implement the requirements of the recast Energy Performance of Buildings Directive 2010/31/EU (recast EPBD directive). This Practice Note is part of a series of notes on EPCs and minimum energy efficiency requirements (MEES).

Brexit impact

This content is likely to be impacted by the UK’s withdrawal from the EU. For information on how leaving the EU will affect environmental law, see Practice Note: Brexit—environmental law implications, which details the relevant aspects of the withdrawal process, as well as providing insights into developments affecting environmental protection, such as the draft Environmental Principles and Governance Bill.

The date and time of withdrawal of the EU (exit day) is specified in UK law (under section 20 of the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018), but until the legal terms of the withdrawal negotiated with the EU are finalised, there remains a possibility that the UK’s membership will lapse automatically on exit day, without all the necessary legal and transitional arrangements in place. This has implications for practitioners considering specific environmental law