Employment tribunal fees 29–7–13 to 26–7–17 [Archived]

The following Employment practice note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Employment tribunal fees 29–7–13 to 26–7–17 [Archived]
  • How to submit claims and pay employment tribunal fees or seek remission of a fee
  • Submitting a claim and paying an issue fee or applying for remission online
  • Submitting a claim and paying an issue fee or applying for remission by post or DX
  • Hand delivery of a claim and an issue fee payment or remission application
  • Paying other types of fee or applying for remission from them
  • Whether it is possible to pay fees in cash
  • Types of claim: type A, type B, exempt
  • Type A claims
  • Type B claims
  • More...

Employment tribunal fees 29–7–13 to 26–7–17 [Archived]

PLEASE NOTE: On 26 July 2017 the Supreme Court handed down its judgment in R (on the application of Unison) v Lord Chancellor [2017] IRLR 911 and declared that the Employment Tribunals and the Employment Appeal Tribunal Fees Order 2013, SI 2013/1893, introduced on 29 July 2013, was unlawful under both domestic and EU law because it had the effect of preventing access to justice. The Court held that since it had that effect as soon as it was made, it was therefore unlawful ab initio, and must be quashed. This has the effect that fees no longer apply. Rule 11 (relating to the rejection of a claim if it is not accompanied by a fee or a remission application) and rule 40 (dealing with the effect of non-payment of fees) of the Employment Tribunals Rules of Procedure were therefore also quashed.

This Practice Note reflects the position prior to the Supreme Court’s judgment. It is retained as historical reference material only and is not updated.

The Supreme Court’s decision in R (on the application of Unison) v Lord Chancellor [2017] IRLR 911 and details of its prospective and retrospective implications are explained in our new Practice Note: The unlawfulness of employment tribunal and EAT fees: decision and implications.

The provisions covering fees chargeable in the

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