EHC assessments and the contents of EHC plans
Produced in partnership with Hannah Lynch of St Pauls Chambers
EHC assessments and the contents of EHC plans

The following Local Government guidance note Produced in partnership with Hannah Lynch of St Pauls Chambers provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • EHC assessments and the contents of EHC plans
  • EHC assessments and the contents of EHC plans
  • Pitfalls to avoid when drafting EHC plans
  • Preparing EHC plans for children and young people who had statements of SEN

EHC assessments and the contents of EHC plans

The Children and Families Act 2014 (CFA 2014) replaced the system of ‘statutory assessment’ under the Education Act 1996 (EA 1996), with one of ‘education, health and care (EHC) assessments’. The aim of the EHC assessment system was to replace statutory assessment with a process which was much more accessible to parents, young people and to improve multi-agency decision-making.

While intended as a radical overhaul of the statutory assessment system, in many respects the EHC assessment regime is overwhelmingly similar to its predecessor. The new system was an ambitious attempt to make the world of special education needs and disabilities (SEND) provision more collaborative, responsive and family-friendly. The success of this has varied considerably from authority to authority and has been made much more challenging to implement by the squeeze on local government funding.

Notable changes introduced by CFA 2014:

  1. EHC plans are now available for children and young people from 0–25 years of age, where required (whereas statements could only be issued for children between the ages of 2–16)

  2. for children not deemed to need an EHC plan, the old categories of ‘School Action’ and ‘School Action Plus’ have been replaced with the ‘graduated response’ as defined in Chapter Six of the SEN Code of Practice 2015 (COP), particularly COP, para