Duty of candour and disclosure requirements in judicial review
Produced in partnership with Morayo Fagborun Bennett of Hardwicke Chambers
Duty of candour and disclosure requirements in judicial review

The following Public Law practice note Produced in partnership with Morayo Fagborun Bennett of Hardwicke Chambers provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Duty of candour and disclosure requirements in judicial review
  • Default lack of formal disclosure and inspection exercise
  • General duty of candour
  • Defendant’s duty of candour
  • Expected standard of behaviour
  • Extent of the duty of candour
  • Stage of proceedings at which the duty of candour is relevant
  • Primary responsibility for disclosure process
  • Consequences of failure to discharge the duty of candour
  • Formal disclosure
  • More...

Disclosure (stating that a document exists or has existed) in judicial review proceedings is expected to be achieved through compliance with the duty of candour rather than a formal disclosure process.

Default lack of formal disclosure and inspection exercise

Disclosure is not required unless the court orders otherwise. This default position is because judicial review is usually concerned with the legal consequences of (largely) agreed facts and the court is not trying to resolve factual disputes. This applies in judicial review, statutory reviews and appeals in the Administrative Court.

The court has a broad discretion to order disclosure. However, that discretion will be exercised sparingly.

General duty of candour

All parties to judicial review proceedings are under a general duty of candour requiring them to disclose facts and information needed and ensure they are put before the court for the fair determination of the issues:

  1. expert witnesses in personal injury cases to have access to documents on drug manufacture for the purposes of the case, for other purposes the witness (a journalist) was under a duty of confidentiality not to disclose

  2. the timing of disclosure of evidence has a bearing on costs and assessment of payments in

Adherence to the duty of candour should result in sufficient disclosure.

Defendant’s duty of candour

The duty of candour for a defendant in judicial review proceedings is to be open and frank throughout them.

A public

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