Domains and domain names—Netherlands—Q&A guide

The following TMT practice note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Domains and domain names—Netherlands—Q&A guide
  • 1. Which entity is responsible for registration of domain names in the country code top-level domain (ccTLD)?
  • 2. How are domain names registered?
  • 3. For how long is registration effective?
  • 4. What is the cost of registration?
  • 5. Are registered domain names transferable? If so, how? Can the use of a domain name be licensed?
  • 6. What are the differences, if any, with registration in the ccTLD as compared with a generic top-level domain (gTLD)?
  • 7. Is the registrant’s contact information freely available? Can the registrant use a privacy service to hide its contact information?
  • 8. If a registrant’s contact information is hidden, under what circumstances will it be disclosed? What processes are available to lift a registrant’s privacy shield?
  • 9. Are third parties (such as trademark holders) notified of a domain name registration or attempt to register a domain name? If so, how? If not, how can third parties receive notice?
  • More...

Domains and domain names—Netherlands—Q&A guide

This Practice Note contains a jurisdiction-specific Q&A guide to domains and domain names in Netherlands published as part of the Lexology Getting the Deal Through series by Law Business Research (published: February 2020).

Authors: Bird & Bird LLP—Manon Rieger-Jansen; Clemens Molle

1. Which entity is responsible for registration of domain names in the country code top-level domain (ccTLD)?

The Foundation for Internet Domain Registration in the Netherlands (SIDN) is responsible for the registration of the .nl ccTLD. The SIDN also provides registry services for, inter alia, .aw (Aruba), .amsterdam and .politie (police).

2. How are domain names registered?

The first step to registering a domain name is for an applicant to contact a registrar of his or her choice. A registrar is an intermediary that will represent the applicant in dealings with the SIDN. There are about 1,200 registrars in the Netherlands and they are all listed on the website of the SIDN (www.sidn.nl/en/registrars/). The registrar will provide the applicant with the general terms of the SIDN and will submit the application. After receiving the application from the registrar, the SIDN will register the domain name, unless the domain name does not meet the technical requirements or is inconsistent with public order or decency. The SIDN may refuse to register a domain name if the applicant has failed to fulfil its obligations to the SIDN

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