Domain name transfer (.com)
Produced in partnership with Emily Taylor of Oxford Information Labs
Domain name transfer (.com)

The following TMT practice note Produced in partnership with Emily Taylor of Oxford Information Labs provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Domain name transfer (.com)
  • What does a domain transfer mean?
  • Inter-Registrar transfer
  • Registrant transfer
  • In what circumstances would a domain name transfer arise?
  • Change of Registrar
  • Sale of domain name
  • As part of a corporate transaction (merger or acquisition)
  • Settlement of a dispute
  • Following a court judgment or UDRP decision
  • More...

This Practice Note covers the transfer of .com and other generic Top Level Domain (gTLD) names and supports the Precedent: gTLD domain name transfer agreement (.com).

It covers:

  1. What does a domain transfer mean?

  2. In what circumstances would a domain name transfer arise?

  3. A step-by-step guide to a domain name transfer

  4. What could go wrong?

Note that transfers of gTLDs (including .com) are subject to transfer policies developed through ICANN. Policies relating to country code Top Level Domain names such as .uk are developed locally by the individual registries. This Practice Note does not cover .uk domain name transfers, which follow a different process. For information about .uk domain name transfers, see Practice Note: Domain name registration and transfer (.uk).

For more information about the measures implemented to bring the WHOIS ,service into compliance with the GDPR and the implications for using the service, see Practice Note: WHOIS: How to find information about domain names.

What does a domain transfer mean?

Confusingly, in the gTLD space the word ‘transfer’ could mean:

  1. transfer of a domain from one Registered Name Holder (or owner) to another (Registrant transfer), or

  2. transfer of a domain from one Registrar to another (Inter-Register transfer)

If a domain name is transferred from one Registrar to another, it could still be ‘owned’ or operated by the same Registered Name Holder.

If the domain name is to change hands—from one

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